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Don’t let feelings of stress get the better of you

We all go through times of stress but no matter its cause, any amount of stress can be both emotionally and physically taxing. Most of us do our best to push the feelings away but ignoring the effects of stress can increase the risk of developing long-term health issues like heart attack and diabetes.

Stress is generally built up over time and it doesn’t discriminate. Anyone is susceptible to feelings of stress; students as they prepare for exams, a heavy workload at the office, financial strain or personal problems. All these issues tend to create stress for us.

Treating stress isn’t as simple as going on medication – it’s impossible to completely remove stress from your life. However, there are ways you can manage your stress and prevent it from overwhelming you:

  • Do a stock take – think about what things in your life act as triggers for stress. This will help you to eliminate unnecessary stresses in your life, while those you can’t get rid of you can better prepare yourself to manage.
  • Manage it sooner rather than later – once you are familiar with your sources of stress, you will be able to develop your own action plan and before the stress builds up and creates bigger problems, you will be able to deal with it.
  • Stress as a motivator – sometimes stress can be a good motivator for getting tasks done, so if you take the time to track whether the stress you’re feeling is helpful or not, you’ll be able to recognise the different degrees of stress you feel and manage it accordingly.

If stress has become harder to manage and you find yourself being burdened by its power to overwhelm you, you might consider an effective, non-invasive form of therapy such as hypnosis. The process of hypnosis is rewarding, positive and safe. Hypnosis calms your nerves, mind and the whole body, alleviating the stress that hinders your everyday life. It can be a truly beneficial solution for those who often feel defeated by stress.

When a person undergoes hypnosis, they are placed into a deep state of relaxation whereby the subconscious mind becomes receptive to positive suggestion, new ideas and perspectives. It is then that a therapist can provide motivational encouragement, confidence building statements and a stronger means of managing stress.

If are finding yourself under a constant cloud of pressure and stress, you might like to consider hypnosis as a form of treatment. If you would like to find out more about how hypnosis can help you lead a happier life, contact a member of the Brand New Mindset team today.

 

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Don’t panic! How to know when it’s creeping up on you

Your heart starts beating faster; you can’t catch your breath; your vision gets blurry. If you’ve ever experienced any of these symptoms, paired with feelings of overwhelming anxiety or a sudden surge of fear, then you’re probably familiar with panic attacks.

Panic attacks can occur out of the blue, without any warnings or triggers. It is possible to have an attack only once, but it’s more likely that a person will experience repeat episodes. You can have panic attacks, but otherwise be perfectly happy and healthy.

So how can you tell if you are about to have one? There are a few common symptoms that you can look out for:

  • Dry mouth­ – One of the more common symptoms during a panic attack. If you want to counter a dry mouth and attempt to manage the attack, try sipping on water or suck on a boiled sweet to stimulate the production of saliva.
  • Shaking and shivering – When your body temperature drops, the muscles spasmodically contract, creating friction between muscles and body tissues and increasing your body temperature. During an anxiety attack, shaking and shivering is normal.
  • Heart palpitations – These are also very common during panic attacks and are caused by the release of adrenaline into the bloodstream. You may feel like your heart is skipping beats. This is perfectly normal and won’t cause any physical damage.
  • Body pain – Feeling pain in your neck, shoulders, chest, jaw, mouth and stomach, as well as having a headache is also common. When the body is under stress, parts of the body usually get tense, which results in pain. Do your best to try and relax if these pains arise.
  • Shortness of breath – This tends to be the most distressing symptom of an anxiety attack, making you feel as though you can’t catch your breath. If you experience this, the best way to counteract it is to remind yourself that you won’t suffocate, stop breathing or pass out and that this is only temporary.
  • Feeling detached – This symptom can alter the way you interact with and perceive reality. It leads you to think everything around you is part of a dream or unreal.

Understanding the symptoms of a panic attack is the first step in learning to control its effect on your everyday life. If you’d like to find out more about panic attacks and what you can do to help manage their impact on you, contact a member of our team today.

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Fear, phobia or anxiety – what’s the difference?

As humans we are biologically wired to be scared of certain things. These are normally things that will cause us grievous bodily harm, think snakes and spiders. Fear serves to protect us by signalling danger and kicking our ‘fight or flight’ response into gear.

We are all scared of different things and experience fear at different levels of intensity – for some people seeing a snake will make them cautious and move slowly away whereas someone else may be paralysed with fear. So, how do you tell the difference between a fear and a phobia, and for that matter, anxiety?

A Fear

Fear is a natural, emotional response to the threat of real danger. It is a basic survival mechanism occurring in response to a specific stimulus, such as pain or the threat to one’s safety.

Anxiety

Fear should not be confused with anxiety, which is very similar to fear but usually occurs without any external threat. With anxiety you anticipate a future danger. Anxiety can be mild, such as being slightly nervous before and exam; or intense. Mild anxiety can motivate you to act, for example by studying for your exam. Intense anxiety, however, can cause you to avoid a specific situation. Sometimes anxiety can be out of proportion.

A Phobia

Phobias are best described as an intense or irrational reaction to something or a given situation. The sufferer often experiences feelings completely out of their control. Once made aware, a sufferer will actively ensure that they never find themselves in any situation that could trigger a phobic reaction.

While phobias vary in severity from person to person, some people can experience panic attacks which can be incapacitating. Most people know that their feat is irrational, but they feel powerless to stop it.

Treatments such as hypnotherapy are very effective in treating phobias as they can help change perceptions of what it is that scares us. Along with Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Hypnotherapy can help to gradually desensitise the person to the fear producing object. Relaxation and visualisation techniques usually accompany hypnotherapy and help to form new emotional habits such as being calmer and more relaxed; helping to neutralise the impact of fears and phobias.

If you find yourself being limited by a fear or phobia, you might like to consider an effective, non-invasive form of treatment such as hypnosis. If you’d like to find out more about hypnotherapy, contact us today.

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Do you have a fear of change?

Most of us associate fear or feelings of anxiety with some kind of danger. But fear or anxiety can also be a reaction to something that simply pushes you outside of your comfort zone, and more often than not you can have these feelings without anything bad having happened. We’re talking about a fear of change.

Change, really? Why be afraid of change? Well in fact there is some sense to it. From early on in our lives routine and structure make us feel safe, confident and in control of what’s going on in our lives. When a change comes along – positive or negative, big or small, it disturbs the norm. The fear of the unknown can cause anxiety and while we can’t stop change from happening, there are things you can do to help how you respond to it:

  • Get organised – The more organised you feel, the better equipped you’ll be to deal with change.
  • Get familiar – Be prepared. We tend to fear that which we don’t know so why not tackle the fear by building your knowledge and familiarity with those things that make you nervous. Taking on a new position at work? Why not reach out to a friend or a family member who has been through a promotion recently and ask about how they managed the change.
  • Get excited! Embrace it! – As mentioned earlier, we can’t stop change from happening so instead of hesitating or feeling nervous by it simple embrace it. It will help you adjust better and settle in quicker to the change.
  • Get out – While facing our fears and anxieties is one of the best ways to overcome them, sometimes it is necessary to leave or remove ourselves from the source of our stress or anxiety. It can be just as effective to take a step back and take care of ourselves.

If your fear of change is limiting your life or causing you stress, contact a member of the Brand New Mindset team today.

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