Open post

Escape the ‘overly restrictive rules’

One of the biggest stumbling blocks to a healthy relationship with food, is the food rules trap. Unless you have allergies or intolerances to certain foods, an overly restrictive attitude can set you up for failure.  This is especially true over the holiday period when food forms such a big part of many social gatherings.

Do you find yourself using words like “should”, “have to”, “always” or “never” in relation to food and exercise? Talking in absolutes like this can add additional stress especially when you evaluate yourself against unrealistic benchmarks.

Did you know that only 10% of your mind represents your conscious mind? That is where you reason and make decisions, it’s where your willpower is stored. The other 90% represents your subconscious mind. This is your auto function and the area that makes you breathe, manages your body and your emotions. This is where your beliefs, automatic responses and habits reside, as well as your primitive ‘fight or flight’ response.

Many of our beliefs are formed in our early years from what we see, hear and experience. As a child, you are ‘programmed’ for your adult years during the developmental phase, and it is this subconscious ‘programming’ that will run 95 % of your adult life. So, if your subconscious mind has been taught ‘eating is comfort’ or ‘I can’t exercise’, that is what 90% of your mind will steer you to do. The conscious 10% that does not hold that believe (your willpower) must contend with the 90% and it becomes a tug of war.

To escape the ‘overly restrictive rules’ trap, you must first change your mindset. A behavioural counsellor can assist you by:

  • Identifying your personal diet traps

During this phase you need to identify those personal stumbling blocks that hold you back. Are you an emotional eater? Is it hard to say ‘no’ in social or family situations? Do you travel a lot for work; or are weekends and holidays your personal pitfall?  Are you self-critical or an ‘all or nothing’ thinker?

The focus is on identifying your reasons for being overweight, for “emotional eating”, and not caring for yourself or making yourself a priority in your life. You need to look at all the aspects of weight loss – diet and exercise, as well as the emotional issues, fears, beliefs and a life script that might be getting in the way of helping you achieve your goals.

  • Overcoming barriers

It’s important to recognise the difference between the physical feeling of being hungry as opposed to emotional hunger. You also need to develop strategies to overcome the typical stress traps – life is too busy to make time to prepare healthy meals; using food to relax after a hectic day; or having overly restrictive rules about food.

  • Tools for success

There are cognitive strategies that you can use to change your mindset; psychological strategies that help you deal with emotional eating and stress; behavioural strategies that encourage the formation of new healthy eating and exercise habits; and problem-solving strategies that give you the tools to conquer the daily diet challenges that everyday life throws at you.

If you’re struggling with ‘unreasonable rules’, contact us to find out how we can help you.

 

Open post

Mindset reset – 5 tips for staying on track during the holidays

If you’ve worked hard all year on your healthy eating and exercise plan, only to be confronted by tables laden with festive treats in December and January, we have some tips to avoid some of the mindset traps that can be self-sabotaging:

Tip 1: ‘What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas’ mindset

Just because it’s holidays, doesn’t mean it’s a free for all.

Tip 2: Overly restrictive rules

You will really struggle over the festive season if you have imposed overly restrictive food rules on yourself. You can’t and shouldn’t avoid the socialising that accompanies the holidays, so develop a realistic plan for coping with eating out. This may involve smaller portions or food substitutes or even offering to bring a plate.

Tip 3: All or nothing thinking

Just because you might have slipped up and indulged a bit too much, that doesn’t mean all is lost. Pick yourself up and remember why you want to make changes in your life.

Tip 4: Getting your moneys worth

Buffets can be one of the biggest traps for the ‘get your money’s worth’ mindset. Plan beforehand and repeat your positive affirmations about why you want to develop a healthy relationship with food.

Tip 5: Start on Monday

How many times have you said that? Speak to one of the Brand New Mindset counsellors, we equip you with the cognitive strategies to change your mindset; psychological strategies that help you deal with emotional eating and stress; behavioural strategies that encourage the formation of new healthy eating and exercise habits; and problem solving strategies that give you the tools to conquer the daily diet challenges that everyday life throws at you.

One of the most common misconceptions about dieting is that all you have to do is eat less and move more. Unfortunately, if it was that simple we would not be facing an obesity epidemic. You also have to change the way you think.  Speak to a Brand New Mindset counsellor today about our concise, practical program that will help you keep on track during the holidays.

 

Open post

How to help your anxious child

Not long now and many children will be getting ready for their first day of school or first day of a new school. While most children take this in their stride, a child suffering from Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) will tend to worry excessively.

While many children worry about making friends, getting good grades, or finding their way around a new school; a child with GAD will find it hard to control their worry on most days. They tend to expect the worst and got locked into a worry cycle. They may try to control things or avoid certain situations and may have physical symptoms like stomach-aches or headaches.

As a parent this can leave you feeling hopeless as you struggle on a daily basis to support your child and allay their fears. However, there are a number of treatment approaches that can help.

  1. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

A well-researched therapeutic approach based on the belief that if we address the way we think and behave, we can change the way we feel. One technique used in CBT is Exposure Therapy, whereby children are gradually exposed to the things that trigger anxiety in a safe environment. Fears and phobias respond very well to exposure therapy. The more times a sufferer is exposed to the stressful situation, it appears less threatening and the more desensitized they will become which will ease their symptoms.

There have also been a number of studies that have looked at the effectiveness of using Virtual Reality (VR) as a tool to providing exposure therapy.  The advantage of using VR is that it provides a therapist with the ability to gradually expose the child to the stressful situation, monitoring their anxiety at each step and preparing them to deal with it. The therapist is there with the child in the situation, which is not always possible in real life. Using VR as part of the therapy process allows the anxious child to confront the feared situation repeatedly until it no longer causes anxiety.

  1. Hypnotherapy

Hypnotherapy for children and young people is considered highly effective and is completely safe. Children tend to respond very well to hypnosis as they are naturally quite imaginative and use their subconscious minds a great deal more than adults do. Hypnotherapy can help to address a number of issues commonly experienced in childhood, including exam nerves, sleep problems, fears and low self-esteem.

If you feel that your child’s worrying is affecting the quality of their life, then contact us to see how we can help you.

 

Open post

12 blogs of Christmas Counselling

On the first day of Christmas
my counsellor said to me:
This new trend is one to look at if you’re not a fan of flying.

On the second day of Christmas
my counsellor said to me:
Heading into Christmas party season, VR can help you to beat the bulge.

On the third day of Christmas
my counsellor said to me:
This is the 21st Century skill that instils fear in most of us.

On the fourth day of Christmas
my counsellor said to me:
This is Virtual Reality Therapy and this is how it can help you.

On the fifth day of Christmas
my counsellor said to me:
Here are some tips for a good night’s sleep.

On the sixth day of Christmas
my counsellor said to me:
How many times have you said “I can’t do that”.

On the seventh day of Christmas
my counsellor said to me:
Want to know how to lose weight easily?

On the eighth day of Christmas
my counsellor said to me:
This is why it’s important to understand how your child’s mind works.

On the ninth day of Christmas
my counsellor said to me:
These are 10 signs you have an unhealthy relationship with food.

On the tenth day of Christmas
my counsellor said to me:
There’s help for panic attacks. Here are 8 signs you’re having one and what to do.

On the eleventh day of Christmas
my counsellor said to me:
You can overcome fears and phobias.

On the twelfth day of Christmas
my counsellor said to me:
Reduce your negative self-talk and build your self-esteem.

 

Posts navigation

1 2 3